Fish & Chips

Every Tuesday Night at The Boat


Just £12.95

Includes ‘pint, plonk or Prosecco’


fish-chips-night-aviemore

North Atlantic Cod and Haddock, Wester-Ross Salmon, and other fish available. Served with chips and mushy peas.

Who can resist the mouth-watering combination - moist white fish in crisp golden batter, served with a generous portion of hot, fluffy chips?

Winston Churchill called them "the good companions". John Lennon smothered his in tomato ketchup. Michael Jackson liked them with mushy peas.

Everyone has their own preferences and tastes vary from one part of the country to another. Cod or haddock? Salt and vinegar? Pickled onion? Scraps? The fish was usually sold by street sellers from large trays hung round their necks. Charles Dickens refers to an early fish shop or "fried fish warehouse" in Oliver Twist (1839) where the fish generally came with bread or baked potatoes.


North or south?

Who first had the bright idea to marry fish with chips remains the subject of fierce controversy and we will probably never know for sure. It is safe to say it as somewhere in England but arguments rage over whether it was up north or down south. Some credit a northern entrepreneur called John Lees. As early as 1863, it is believed he was selling fish and chips out of a wooden hut at Mossley market in industrial Lancashire. Others claim the first combined fish 'n' chip shop was actually opened by a Jewish immigrant, Joseph Malin, within the sound of Bow Bells in East London around 1860. Outlets sprung up across the country and soon they were as much a part of Victorian England as steam trains and smog. Italian migrants passing through English towns and cities saw the growing queues and sensed an opportunity, setting up shops in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. To keep prices down, portions were often wrapped in old newspaper.

Morale booster

It has even been suggested that fish and chips helped win World War I.

According to Professor John Walton, author of Fish and Chips and the British Working Class, the government made safeguarding supplies a priority. George Orwell in The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) put fish and chips first among the home comforts that helped keep the masses happy and "averted revolution".

During World War II, ministers bent over backwards to make sure fish and chips were one of the few foods that were never rationed.